What I’m Proud Of [Flipping the Switch on Anxiety]

Soooo, anxiety has been kicking my butt lately, and it’s so frustrating. What’s even worse is that I have no idea why it’s plaguing me right now – it basically came out of nowhere. It could be related to everything going on in my gut right now. (Mind and body, especially the gut, are highly connected AND vice versa.) But I was in a flare for 5+ years and never felt like this, so I don’t know.

Ever since I had a colonoscopy back in May, I’ve dealt with some (mostly) minor flare symptoms.* I just can’t seem to kick them, and I’ve struggle with seemingly “out of nowhere” anxiety. I really haven’t had crazy anxiety like this since my Designed to Fit/Nutrition House Software days (and, god, life was tough then), so it seems so mysterious to me. I honestly felt like I made great strides with managing my anxiety, but then, boom, it hit me hard. I’ve found myself amped up and worried about things I haven’t thought twice about in months and months. Ughhhh…

Long story short, I decided to focus on a few things that I’m feeling really good about lately. Sometimes focusing on the positive, instead of the overwhelming negativity that anxiety can bring, really does make a difference. Ok, here we go!

I’m slowly, but surely overcoming my fear of public speaking. If you’re a long-time reader, you know I used to avoid speaking opportunities at all costs. I can’t even begin to explain how many amazing opportunities I said no to because of my extreme fear of public speaking. I spoke on a number of panels over the years (FoodBuzz, Fitness Magazine, AOL, Fitbloggin‘), but, even then, I wasn’t contributing all that much to the conversation. I was so scared and basically had zero confidence in myself and what I had to say. Fast-forward to one million Instagram Lives and other videos, public speaking really doesn’t rattle me anymore. Sure, I’m a little nervous at the start, but those feelings don’t spiral into a panic attack like they used to! I’m honestly excited to share what I know and help others.

I recently participated in a nutrition workshop at Bodymechanics PT. I spoke for 20-25 minutes about macros and meal planning, followed by a Q&A session.

Bodymechanics workshop Norwell, Ma

It went really well, and I’m excited for more opportunities like this. I’m actually kind of shocked to even write that… let’s just say, I’ve come a LONG way with public speaking! 🙂

I’ve battled flare symptoms since May, and I’ve been very “zen” about it. In the past, when I was in a flare, the sky was falling. I’d freak out that I couldn’t control what was happening to my body, and I would obsess about everything related to my health. This time, I’m taking things day by day and trying to stay calm about my symptoms. I’m also practicing some serious gratitude for the parts of my body that are healthy, and thanking my lucky starts that I can do certain things, like walk downstairs, go for a run, or eat out at a restaurant. In my sickest moments with this disease, I wasn’t able to do these things, so I don’t take them for granted. Flipping the switch on my thinking has definitely helped!

I’m also really proud of…

My nutrition coaching business. It really is my pride and joy, and I love helping clients find a better mindset and relationship with food. Plus, after DTFN and NHS blew up, I totally felt like a failure, but I took what I learned and rebuilt CNC Nutrition + Coaching, and it’s SUCH a better experience for our clients and myself!

Question of the Day

What are you feeling proud of lately?

How do you deal with anxiety? 

* Here’s a little aside that I didn’t know until recently (thank you, IBD friends), but colonoscopies can really mess up the microbiome and balance of your gut… and you can refuse them. There are other tests (like “pooping in a hat” as my old doctor would say) that can give you similar information (i.e. inflammation markers, signs of blood in the stool). Of course, if there’s something serious going on, you should listen to your doctor and go through with the colonoscopy. But if you’re someone like me, who WAS in remission, but needed a routine colonoscopy, it’s okay to seek-out other testing options. YOU are in control of your health. Obviously, everyone’s situation is different, but I just wanted to share this information since I was completely unaware, and now I’m still dealing with a flare 3+ months later.

13 Comments

  1. Tina, I practice EFT Tapping and am a Hypnotist. Both are great natural options for anxiety. Love to tell you more about it if you are interested.

      1. I am local in Massachusetts ( I am a few towns over from Littleton). If you were interested in, I would be happy to meet and speak with you.

  2. I have dealt with anxiety on and off for the last 10 years and it recently hit me like a brick wall. I just started seeing a therapist which was extremely uncomfortable at first but has helped me greatly. I’ve introduced journaling back into my life and it has helped me manage those overwhelming thoughts on the tough days. Hang in there!

  3. I have UC and experienced a flare after my last colonoscopy two years ago! Ironically everything looked good during the scope but I flared for months after 🙁 so frustrating. I have a new GI who wanted me to do a colonoscopy this summer and I’ve put it off…I’ve been feeling guilty about it but I don’t want to risk another flare. Ugh!! Hope you’re back to feeling good soon.

  4. Isn’t Quinn heading to kindergarten this year? I dealt with anxiety issues at every educational transition with both of my sons. (Even the transition from 8th grade to high school despite the fact I actually work in the high school they attended!)

    My anxiety tends to be relatively minor so for me I manage best by focusing on being wholly healthy. Doing so can be hard because when I feel anxious, my overwhelming desire is to retreat and hide.

    If I keep up my exercise routing (which includes running, strength and yoga); eat a primarily healthy diet (when really what I want when I am anxious is all the chocolate and all the wine); rest as much as possible (sleep is incredibly difficult when I am anxious) and journal/meditate I am usually successful at keeping it at a manageable level.

  5. Thank you for sharing Tina! I’ve recently been struggling with post pardum anxiety and it’s nice to hear how others manage their anxiety.

  6. Great article! Everyday is a battle but everything gets better with time and the right lifestyle! I love journaling in the morning and before every night about all of my struggles as well as all of the things that make me happy.

  7. Have you had your estrogen levels checked? I know you’ve posted about hormonal frustrations. I started noticing that I would get really intense generalized anxiety about once a month, and it never even occurred to me that it could be related to monthly cycles. I read an article recently about low estrogen levels being linked to anxiety, and my fluctuations made a lot of sense after that.

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