Thoughts on Intermittent Fasting, Digestive Issues + Alcohol & Balancing Running with Strength Training

Hi friends! Welcome to the latest edition of CNC Instagram Live with text!

Here’s the most recent episode of Carrots ‘N’ Cake Instagram Live. If you missed the 24 hour replay, it’s shared below for your viewing pleasure. If you have any questions that you’d like for me to answer in the next video, please let me know – either comment below or send me an email or DM on Instagram!

Are you still dealing with your most recent UC flare?

Thank you guys for asking! I’v been in minor flare since the end of May when I had a routine colonoscopy, and ever since then I haven’t been great. Whatever happened during the colonoscopy must have messed up the balance of my gut. Tip for the IBD folks: if things are going great for you GI-wise, you don’t need to have a colonoscopy – other tests can test for inflammation. I am still dealing with the flare, but I’m doing better-ish; I’m trying some new supplements, doing mind/body stuff, mediation, and Qigong on occasion. Food-wise, I recently tried tofu and it definitely didn’t agree with me, so I’m back to keeping it simple with my diet. Overall, I’m trying not to stress about it and think of it as just a blip in my overall health journey. I’m trying to stay zen!

What are your thoughts on intermittent fasting?

I think it’s great… if it works for you. Intermittent fasting (IF) is a fancy way of saying you’re limiting your eating window in any given day. Essentially, we all do it when we naturally fast between the time we eat dinner and breakfast. I have some clients who do intermittent fasting and it really works for them. I’ll do it from time-to-time, but it’s usually by accident (i.e. I’ll have a busy morning and won’t eat breakfast until late morning). In general, I think IF is an effective tool for the right person and their specific goals. My personal experience with intermittent fasting.

UPDATE: After I recorded this Instagram Live, I listened to Dr. Stephen Cabral on the Mind Pump Podcast and changed my thinking a bit about intermittent fasting. Dr. Cabral actually said IF can be “detrimental” for women, especially with regard to their hormones and thyroid. If you have thyroid issues or have symptoms of a thyroid issue, IF might not be the best for you. It’s also not a great tool if you’re someone who is typically stressed in the morning (i.e. getting kids ready for the day, working out, running out the door). Check out the episode for additional details + tons of interesting information about artificial sweeteners, high-protein diets (i.e. Keto), EMF’s (electromagnetic fields), and more!

Dr. Stephen Cabral_Mind Pump Podcast

Is Quinn going to Kindergarten?

Yes! Our baby is starting school soon… riding the school bus and everything. He keeps talking about it, so I’m glad he’s excited. He’ll be in school from 8:00am-3:00pm everyday, except Tuesdays, which is a half-day.

How long did it take for you to consume alcohol while dealing with chronic digestive issues?

When I was really sick, I didn’t drink at all. On time, at a family party while on vacation, I was offered the tiniest glass of wine and turned it down. I was so obsessed with everything I ate and drank, and it was miserable!

I had an amazing GI doctor, and I have this memory from one of my appointments: He put his arm around me and told me to drink a bottle of wine. He clearly knew I could use a bit of alcohol to help me relax since I was so stressed from trying to control my disease. I think a glass or two of wine can definitely help you pause and smell the roses, but I do know it’s important to moderate the amount while you’re in the thick of a GI flare. I don’t consider myself a true “wino,” but I do enjoying a couple glasses of wine on the weekends or for special occasions.

Training for a race while keeping up with strength training?

I trained for the Boston Marathon while still doing CrossFit. So I know, first hand, that you can’t excel at both simultaneously.  You can certainly strength train while training for a race, but you need to focus on your ultimate goal — race day. I recommend you incorporate some strength training into your training plan (cross-training is helpful to avoid injury), but make training runs your priority. Strength training will be secondary. As I was training for Boston and my mileage increased, I did less and less CrossFit. Check out this post for additional tips: How to Balance Running + CrossFit/Strength Training.

So, there you have it! I hope you guys love watching these Instagram Lives as much as I enjoy doing them, so keep the questions coming!

5 Comments

  1. My daughter is dealing with some GI issues and it stresses me out so much, 1. bc I cannot make her better and I have a lot of mom guilt over it and 2. it makes her childhood different from her siblings! Quint must be going to a private school for that schedule. We are enrolling ours in private school and they have 1/2 days on Friday! And now I want to train for a marathon!

  2. Thank you for adding the text, it’s great! It always scares me when anyone suggests skipping a routine colonoscopy. If you have UC/Crohn’s/IBD you’ve probably had your fair share of colonoscopies and your team of doctors and GIs are well aware of the amount of testing necessary to prevent colon cancer. It stinks to have to go through that so often. But, respectfully, to the average reader (who maybe has a family member with one of these terrible GI diseases or another risk factor) testing is so key for prevention. There has been an increase of people in their 30s and 40s with colon cancer and often by the time there are symptoms it can be more advanced. (To be clear, I think Tina is just telling her truth and isn’t giving medical advice to the average person but I had to give my two cents from personal experience).

  3. Hello,

    I’m interested in the macro plans/coaching. What education do your coaches have? Are they RDs?

    Thank you
    Rachel

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