3-Minute Peanut Butter Cookie

Hello! It’s a beautiful day here! 😎

After breakfast, I headed to a tough Body Pump class. Well, it wasn’t any more difficult than the average class”” I just decided to increase my weight on a few of the exercises.

For the past few months, I feel like I’ve been coasting along at Body Pump, using the same weight week after week, and not really challenging myself, so I stepped-it-up today! Notable weight increases (includes 3-pound bar):

  • Chest: 28 lbs.
  • Deadlifts: 33 lbs.
  • Shoulders: 23 lbs.

I’m telling ya, I’m a beast! 😉 I really want to get stronger, so I’m going to keep using these new weight increases and maybe add some more in the coming weeks. I’d much rather skip a few reps using heavier weight than coast through a track without breaking a sweat.

Lunch

When I got home, I was starving! I guess this morning’s breakfast didn’t hold me over to lunch very well. My stomach started growling during Body Pump around 9:30 AM!

For lunch, I threw together a quick salad, which I topped with leftover Lime Leaf chicken, roasted cauliflower, and balsamic vinegar.

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After lunch, I had a serious craving for a cookie, so I did a little experimenting in the kitchen, and the end result was pretty awesome. My 3-Minute Oatmeal Raisin Cookie now has a sibling! Introducing the sweet, soft 3-Minutes Peanut Butter Cookie!

Ingredients:

Directions:

  1. Combine the above ingredients in a microwave-safe bowl.
  2. Mix ingredients well”” make sure the baking powder is completely blended.
  3. Scrape batter off the sides of the bowl and flatten into a round cookie shape.
  4. Cook in microwave for 60 seconds.
  5. Allow to cool, remove from bowl, and enjoy!

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Yummm! After eating my 3-Minutes Peanut Butter Cookie, I immediately made another one. It was that delicious!

10 Questions About Life As We Know It

I stumbled upon this editorial piece in Glamour magazine, and I thought you guys would enjoy it too: 10 Questions About Life As We Know It.

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Sometimes, late at night, a woman can find herself staring at the ceiling, pondering the universe’s great mysteries. Here are my favorites from the article:

No. 1: Why does Snooki make more money in two episodes than most teachers earn in an entire year?

No. 3: Why is everyone so worried about Jennifer Aniston getting married again and having children when George Clooney is in the same situation and obviously doing just fine

No. 6: Why do female doctors in New York earn $17,000 a year less than male M.D.s? Isn’t the whole pay gap thing getting kinda tired?

What things make you go hmmm?

129 Comments

      1. I have two many wonderings to name. I was always the child that drove her mother crazy asking questions…especially ones she didn’t know how to answer. I never really grew out of it.

    1. @kate: Butting in here to say that in BodyPump, the track we do dead lifts in isn’t a ‘dead lift track’, it’s a clean and press + dead lift + dead row + wide row tract, so it would be impossible to use super heavy weights for this tract. Dead lift 220 lbs in the weight room? yes. But not in BodyPump.

    2. As someone who lifts heavy (think body weight pullups, 165lbs deadlifts, etc.), I thought Body Pump would be a breeze! I gave it a try and it’s nothing like traditional weight lifting, so you really can’t compare (like a previous commenter tried to do)! I thought my arms and legs were going to fall off!

      Props to you, Tina for upping the weight and getting stronger!

  1. 3 minute cookies can be dangerous! I thought my microwave cake was scary to have around. I had to step back from that one. I’m guessing with that weight you used, you burned your breakfast super fast. I love weight training! Feeling strong is great for my self confidence.

  2. What makes me go hmmm is how my typical oatmeal breakfast that usually holds me over for a few hours seemed to evaporate in my stomach this morning within an hour?! I’m going to blame it on my intense weight sesh last night – i’m not quite a beast lifting 30 pds like you but i’m well on my way 😉

  3. What makes me go hmm? How anyone can watch reality tv and then spend hours talking about it the next day. I just listened to my coworkers talk about The Bachelorette for an hour. Ugh.

  4. One thing that makes me go hmm is how your photo of that pb cookie has the power to instantly make me salivate and crave one.. or two… or 6…. 😉

  5. Thanks so much for the PB cookie recipe…I am obsessed with PB (i have even been known to eat half a jar at a time) and this sounds like a great, quick recipe so I can get my PB fix without eating so many calories!

  6. I love increasing my weight in BodyPUMP as well! It is a little harder, as I teach it, so I have to still make sure I can teach the entire thing AND go heavier. But I LOVE that feeling 🙂 I just blogged about my weight increases as well<—it is nice to check in to others!

    Love your idea of an after lunch snack. totally am going to use that recipe, but with AB (I don't like PB) 😉

  7. I’m new to reading your blog so I’m sorry if this has been addressed before, but when you say “liquid egg whites” do you mean just regular ol’ egg whites or some kind of liquid egg substitute? I would LOVE to try that cookie. Thanks!

  8. As a teacher, the one about Snookie drives me nuts. I work my butt off and I’m NOT drunk all the time but that’s what she’s paid for and can afford (possibly) that fancy-schmancy lifestyle.

    1. @Emily: I date a teacher and hearing that frustrates me, for you guys! I suppose that statement probably would apply for the career path I’m going down as well, fantastic.

  9. Lately I have been wondering with everything we have going on in our world the Today show finds it newsworthy to tell us about the Arnold Schwartzanegar (spelling??) and Maria Shriver scandal. Really? Who cares?

  10. It’s so redundant to hear the whole “teachers don’t get paid enough” thing. 3 months off, weekend’s off, and holidays. I don’t agree that celebrities should be given all the glory and money but Teachers get paid well considering the time they have off.

    1. @aaron: I have to wonder if you personally know any teachers. My mom is a teacher, and yes she has summers off, but she works her butt off during the school year. The last five years or so she’s spent almost every Sunday morning in her classroom just so she can stay on top of things. Then you have parent teacher conferences, evening events (they had a carnival a couple weeks ago where she’s pretty much expected to buy raffle tickets and a basket from the silent auction), etc. and the time adds up fast. Plus she spends a lot of her own money and supplies for the classroom. I actually think my mom is quite well paid (she’s close to retirement and has a master’s degree), but starting teachers have it pretty rough. They work hard for what they make!

    2. @aaron: I’m not a teacher, but being married to one has totally changed my opinion about the profession and the amount of time that they have off. The time and energy alone that goes into the 9 months that Mal is teaching is INSANE! It’s not unusual for him to work a 12-hour day most days of the week. Plus, his responsbilities as a teacher are huge– he’s teaching (and sometimes parenting) the future of our country. If anything, teachers should be paid A LOT more! I also think that if teachers didn’t have the summers off, there wouldn’t be any teachers. It’s a tough job!!

        1. @aaron: I’m a teacher and I find this really offensive. Let me break it down like a good elementary school teacher can:

          1. I, as well as many others, work in the summer. YES, that’s right, we work IN THE SUMMER! In the state of NJ (where I live), we don’t get paid throughout the summer. So you have to save (which is hard to do), or you have to get a job on the side in the summer. Some people waitress, teach summer school, tutor, etc. Whatever they do, they are working. So that is a broad statement that does NOT account for MANY teachers in America.

          2. Comparing education to the “corporate world” or any other profession is like comparing apples to oranges. You just can’t. This to me is a very ignorant way to look at things. Until you spend time observing a classroom, and I mean, REALLY observing the classroom, you will see that it is totally different. In fact, I used to work in the corporate world and I can say that I work harder and accomplish more in the “10 months” with my students, then the 2 years I spent in the P.R. industry. I don’t have an hour lunch break. I don’t have the luxury to grab a “quick” coffee and chat with my co-workers about the latest this and that. I don’t have time to even go to the bathroom most days. The half hour they are in specials, I am writing lesson plans, calling parents, creating engaging activities. Oh, and my day DOES NOT end at 3:00. I don’t get home until usually 5:30 – 6:00 and THEN I’m still checking papers. Do I get overtime for this?????? No.

          Of course we have some holidays and weeks off throughout the year. The students need that time off, as well as the teachers. BELIEVE ME!

          As far as the pay scale. Most teachers start out making 35,000 – 40,000 a year. Now, think about it. In MOST places that amount can not support a family or allow someone to live on their own comfortably. Many new teachers have to work two jobs for a long time before they go up the pay scale. AND, the only way we get pay increases is IF we continue OUR education. That means, I have to spend MY HARD EARNED cash on going back to school so that I can make an extra couple of thousand dollars a year.

          Now, I’m not saying that people in the corporate world don’t work hard. I know they do and I respect them because they are doing a job I would not be able to do. However, I don’t analyze their paycheck, I don’t ask them how many vacation days they get, then judge them for it. I don’t make them feel like their job doesn’t matter, because they make more than me. That’s not fair. Yet, people do that to teachers all the time.

          I love teaching. I wouldn’t want to be anything else. But, it’s ignorant comments from people who have NO CLUE what it’s like being in a classroom, that makes the job frustrating.

          Now, I’d love to continue to rant about this topic, but unfortunately it’s 6:15. I have to cook dinner for my family and then sit down and read 25 nonfiction essays. I have students who depend on me and look up to me – and it’s not because I get “summers off” and a good salary.

          1. @Andrea:

            If you can’t live on $40,000, there’s something wrong with you. I understand some places of the country are more expensive than others, but I don’t understand how someone couldn’t “live on their own comfortably”. People manage on a hell of a lot less.

        2. @aaron: I think with teaching, just like in any profession, you have those that are amazing and those that are less than stellar. The sad thing about teaching, however, is that pay is often tied to a scale based only on years of service, not the quality of work or instruction. This leaves some of our best teachers severely underpaid compared to what they would be compensated in other professions with similar output.

        3. @aaron: I’m a school psychologist so I worked with teachers on a daily basis. It’s more than the $$ thing, it’s a respect thing. Our country puts a lot of pressure on teachers to fix all our problems with kids – make sure everyone is achieving or else their school gets closed, figure out how to close the achievement gap, stop bullying, deal with the crazy parents, etc. Not to mention in the state of CA (where I live) teachers are getting cut left and right, so it’s a tireless job with not a lot of security. I don’t see those same demands being placed on the corporate CEOs making 6 figures.

        4. @aaron:

          I agree. Teachers might be underpaid, but quite frankly, we all think we are. We all have to suffer some downsides to our jobs and I don’t know anyone who sits back and thinks they are appropriately paid. And people who think you can’t live of $40,000 have no idea what ACTUALLY needing money is about. Please. I’m in a MA program and work one research job and one part time job to supplement that. And no, I don’t need this part-time job to supplement my $40,000 salary, I actually need it to, you know, pay bills. So I totally see where you’re coming from. Teachers should get paid more. Celebrities should get paid less. But also, there are millions of people in between who deserve a break as well!

          1. @Danielle: I totally agree that $40,000 is not a horrible amount of money and you should be able to live on, but it certainly isn’t extravagant. People seem to think that teachers are rolling in the money, and we aren’t. But, I do have to say living in N.J. is extremely expensive and on top of paying student loans, bills, etc it is very hard to manage. I had to waitress my first three years of teaching to help “supplement” my salary. In a perfect world, we would all be rich!

          2. @Danielle: Oh and if it makes anybody feel better, we are freezing our salaries this year AND paying double for health benefits, so you do the math. Teachers are obviously “sacrificing” right along with the rest of them!

    3. @aaron: I’ll give you the benefit of not being a troll. I’ll also give you enough credit to know what kind of responses you’re going to get.

      Like Tina, I, too, am married to a teacher. My wife teaches special-needs, life-skills, grades K-3. I’ll summarize my response by simply stating, “you try it.”

    4. @aaron: gonna have to ditto Emily and Tina here – most teachers, especially new teachers, don’t make enough in their “9 months” of work, and take on summer jobs in addition. My Dad taught middle school science for 40 years and worked 2 other jobs year round for the first 20 years in order to provide well for us.

      1. @Janene @ OneRun: Teachers have one of the most important jobs in our country (or any other, for that matter), shaping the minds of the youth, often working in classrooms that are overcrowded and sometimes ill-equipped to deal with difficult children. Where we spend our money is a direct indication of what we value and, in my opinion, teachers are underpaid and undervalued.

        1. @Katie (Life Discombobulated):

          I am going to agree with most here. @aaron have you spent much time with hundreds of early adolescents, or kindergardeners? Really? I know that plenty of people work very hard, but being a good teacher is an overwhelming task. Come on into my room for a few days and see what you think.

          I agree that the respect part is most important to most teachers that I know (I am one and so is my husband, mother, mother-in-law).

    5. @aaron: I date a teacher and yes you can climb up the pay scale, but right now in this economy so many teachers are getting cut that they just get bumped right back down to the bottom of the scale after all their previous hard work.

      In addition to all the extra hours they put in that the average person does not know about, I have found my boyfriend being more of a role model to some of his kids than his parents are, they have a lot of pressure on them.

  11. That Snookie question is annoying to think about. It’s not fair..and it’s like that for all the junky reality TV stars. They make loads of money while the people out there actually workin to make a living and doing good for their society don’t even make one tenth of what they do.

  12. seriously! when will people lay off jennifer aniston! it still amazes me how many stories there are about her, brad pitt, and angelina. get over it…they have!

  13. really excited for this three-minute peanut butter cookie! I am not huge fan of “keys, so I have been looking for something like this to pop up for a while. My fiancé doesn’t eat sweets, so I am always wanting a recipe that is really small. I’m going to try this out this week space:)

  14. Had to come over and comment once I saw your tweet about this post, Tina. I’m a teacher and can say first-hand that we are certainly NOT overpaid. People are quick to point out all of our time off – summers, holidays – when daring to say that we are even “overpaid”, but that simply is not a fair assessment.

    I teach high school English, and I will easily put in over 40 hours a week during the school year, including doing work on weekends. Want a quick scenario? One 2-page essay x 93 English 10 students x 10 minutes of grading per essay = 930 minutes of grading. When do I get that done? Not on my “summers off” – after school, Sunday afternoons, the wee hours of the week day mornings.

    And one last thing for non-teachers to consider: trying holding off going to the bathroom all day while playing the role of teacher, counselor, parent, parole officer, attendance secretary, janitor, classroom manager, and conflict arbitrator.

    Whew. That is all (at least all that I can fit in this comment section!)

    p.s. – Tina, that PB cookie idea is awesome. I will be making many of them soon while being an “overpaid” teacher enjoying my well-deserved summer off.

  15. I just graduated with my teaching degree am looking for my first teaching job. There is so much more to teaching than what happens during the school hours. While student teaching, I met several teachers that arrived at school over an hour before school began every day and often stayed after school to prepare for the next day or finish for the day. And the summers off? That is when many teachers are researching and planning for the next school year. Doing what they cannot do during the school year due to lack of time. Plus many teachers take classes during the summer so they can work on a higher degree.
    Here’s something that I came across several months ago that makes you think but has enough sarcasm to make you smile: http://230project.wordpress.com/2011/02/26/teachers-make-too-much-money/

  16. I don’t think teachers are overpaid but there are other underpaid professions too which is where some of those comments come from I think. I am looking to work in higher Ed and need a masters to even get a job but I’ll make half what my teacher friends with masters make!

  17. I’m a teacher and I don’t get paid enough. My first year of teaching in GA, I will start out making a little over 40,000 dollars. I won’t talk about the rising cost of health care premiums and also the furlough days that many districts in the state have instituted. And, I will start out with the pay of a master’s degree, teachers starting with bachelor’s degrees make much less per paycheck. Each state pays teachers differently and each district can decide the local supplement. So, to say that teachers are well paid is a blanket statement. Many of us won’t make 60,000 until we are well into the profession.

    My school day is from 8 to 3:30. Those hours are what my paycheck covers; it doesn’t cover the PTA meetings I’m required to attend, the school functions I’m expected to attend, and the papers that I spend at least an hour and a half grading. It doesn’t cover the hours I stay after school to tutor students. It doesn’t cover the hours per week that I spend writing emails and calling parents. It doesn’t cover the hours outside of school that I spend creating lesson plans for my students. People might say that these are tasks that I could complete during the school day, but I only have an hour and a half of planning. I’m not willing to assign my students busy work while I sit at my desk grading papers. It would be a disservice to them and I’m not that kind of teacher.

    I’m not saying that there aren’t bad teachers out there. I’ve had them and I’ve also worked with them. I DO think that we need to fix the pay scales and use some type of performance based measurements. However, I think the majority of us try our best to educate a student population decreasingly distracted by factors outside of the classroom.

    1. @Heather: Many teachers make plenty of money. I am one of them. I’m not afraid to speak out the truth of the perks we have and the benefits. Sure, I realize I’m not going to get rich being a teacher, but by no means am I poor, and am doing just fine compared to my other friends who have bachelors degrees in other areas, yet we get so much more time off. To the other teachers, stop living in the past when teachers used to get paid awful. Those times are over. The union is corrupt.

  18. As a teacher I have to say that I totally agree with everything said here. It’s kind of ridiculous how ignorant people are about teaching, but I guess I can’t fault someone who’s never visited a classroom or known an actually teacher. Everyday I say to my co-teacher that no one would believe what actually goes in in a classroom (referring to how we are teachers, mothers, confidants, etc). Great discussion and comments!

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